Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

People often view ghosts as departed people who have unfinished business left here on Earth. However, not all of these unfinished business are positive, so in the history of every culture there are myths and legends about ghosts, who apparently don’t want anything but revenge alive, and, as a rule, for no reason apart from anger or anger.

10. Carl Pruitt
Folklore: American

20

In June 1938, a man named Carl Pruitt found out about his wife’s infidelity, who also cheated on him in their family bed. Distraught by betrayal, he grabbed the chain and strangled it, while another man fled. As soon as he realized what he had done, Pruitt committed suicide and was buried away from his wife in another cemetery. Locals began to report that the tombstone seemed to have a chain, although it was not there when it was first installed. It was then that victims began to appear.

The first victim was a little boy who threw stones at the tombstone. While he was riding his bike home, he lost control, as if something (or someone) was controlling the bike, and crashed. During the tragedy, the chain on the bike broke off and strangled the boy. A few weeks later, the boy's mother took an ax and destroyed the tombstone. When after some time she hung out her washed clothes to dry at home, the clothesline broke off and wrapped around her neck, strangling her (her clothesline was also made from a chain, not from a rope). When the authorities arrived at the cemetery, they discovered that the tombstone was not damaged.

Three more people, each of whom disturbed Pruitt’s grave, died in the same way. In the end, after all the other corpses had been moved, his grave was forgotten and overgrown with weeds. In the 1950s, during the open-pit mining, Pruitt’s grave was destroyed. At the moment, no one has been punished for this crime.

9. Sundel Bolong
Folklore: Malaysian

21

One of the most popular ghosts in Malaysian folklore is the spirit of a beautiful woman who has died when she is pregnant and then gave birth to her child while already in a coffin.Some versions say that she died in childbirth. A ghost wanders the earth, dressed in a long white nightgown with long, black hair, reaching to the buttocks, which serve to cover a hole in the back where a child has climbed out of her body.

Her main prey is men, and it is believed that her charms are very difficult to resist. Her name means “prostitute with a hole,” which should give you an idea of ​​her seduction method. As soon as the sundel-bolog lures the man, she castrates him, and, as a rule, leaves him alive, to suffer. Over time, the stories of her origin began to include rape as the cause of her pregnancy; in some versions, it ends suicide because of the resultant pregnancy, from which it turns into a sundol-bologon in the form of a curse.

8. Churel
Folklore: Indian

22

Also known as the chudail or chudel, this ghost in Indian folklore, especially in Northern India, is famous for its cry. Usually taking the form of a woman, a churel appears when a pregnant woman dies during the festival of Diwali (Divali), which is the Hindu “Festival of Lights” (Hindu Festival of Light).In some stories, a ghost appears when a woman dies during childbirth. In any case, the creature returns to the world of the living as a vampire, as a creature fixated on revenge because of the bitterness caused by the death of its unborn child.

A churel, often wandering in the wild, turns its legs 180 degrees, which allows it to move backwards, fascinating the victim with his eyes. If you do not get rid of the eyes of a churela, as a rule, throwing cloth or a blanket over her eyes, she will lure the victim to a secluded place and drink all their blood. The favorite victim of the churela is her own family, because she is angry at her family members for not providing her with proper care during pregnancy. If the body is buried with care and respect, the bloodcurdling thirst can also dry out.

7. Onryo
Folklore: Japanese

23

Onreux is an evil ghost who usually returns to the world of the living to deal with the resentment he has experienced in past lives. As a rule, they are women, although onreux men are also found. The torment of their former loved ones and families brings great pleasure to the spirits, and they often bring the living to the point of committing suicide.Onreux usually wait several days, and even in some cases months, before starting attacks on their relatives, because they want to see who grieves for them and who does not.

Onreux is very much like a mountain that is another kind of ghost in Japanese folklore. He also returns to the world of the living to attack and take revenge, but the city is usually a person from a noble or aristocratic family, and usually dies the death of a martyr. Conversely, he often appears because of some kind of injury, for example because of violence from her husband, but their rage is usually nonspecific, that is, they can attack family members who had nothing to do with their death. In fact, sometimes he doesn't even punish the killer.

6. Phi Tai Hong
Folklore: Thai

24

In Thailand, people who die excessively cruel deaths, or remain unburied or buried without appropriate funeral rites, turn into ghosts known as fi tai hong. A pregnant woman is considered the most powerful version of this ghost, as she combines the power of two thanks to her unborn child.Places of extreme violence, such as the site of a terrorist act or natural disaster, are large breeding grounds for fi tai hong, as young people often die in these places, whose time has not yet come. Shrines are often built in these places to convince ghosts to leave.

As a rule, fi tai hongs remain near their place of death, waiting for a living person to pass by. If possible, the ghost will try to kill the unfortunate mortal, hoping that he will take his place and free him from spiritual slavery. Mangraisat (“The Laws of the King Mengray”) is a collection of laws written in the 14th century that describe in detail the characteristics of murders. When someone killed another person, especially a child, he was often forced to keep a corpse in his house for a predetermined period of time. It was an attempt to create fi tai hong, which then had to torment the killer.

5. Green Lady
Folklore: British, Scottish

25

Known in other areas as glaistig, the Green Lady is the spirit of water, and the upper part of her body resembles a woman, and the lower part is a goat (by analogy with satire).Her human half is covered in gray skin, with long blonde hair that covers most of her body. In addition, she often tries to hide her animal part, wrapping herself in her green robe, thanks to which she got this nickname. The Green Lady is able to change the shape of her body and takes many forms, depending on the intention of the narrator.

Sometimes she can be mischievous, and throws pebbles at passersby or leads people on the wrong track, only to laugh at their misfortune, when they realize that they are lost. There are a lot of legends about its origin. One of the most common states that she was an aristocrat who was killed by one of her employees and shoved into the chimney. It is in this version that the Green Lady lures men to their death with the help of her singing. To pacify her is quite easy, as she is a big fan of milk and therefore she is usually considered as the patroness of livestock.

4. La Siguanaba
Folklore: Central American

26

It is believed that La Siguanaba, originally known as Sihuehuet, which means "beautiful woman", started an affair with the son of the Aztec god Tlaloc.However, she was a terrible mother, and often left her son alone to meet her divine lover. As soon as Tlalok found out about this, he cursed Shihuehuet, making it seem beautiful from afar, but was disgusting up close. She adopted the name of La Siguanaba, or "terrible woman" and was also sentenced to roam the wild in the hope of trapping men.

In El Salvador, it is believed that she washes her clothes in a river, and is forced to spend the rest of her life in search of her son, who was given immortality. Men who brag about their adventures with many women or who engage in adultery often become objects of La Siguanaba’s anger and can also be seen swimming in the moonlight, a rather attractive sight in the jungle. As a rule, an unlucky man dies from fear, but if he manages to survive, then he turns out to be lost in the wild. From time to time, she is also children, in the form of their mothers, luring them to death. The best way to protect against La Siguanaba is to bite a piece of metal or cross and pronounce a prayer to God.

3. Chindi (Chindi)
Folklore: Navajo people

27

In the Navajo belief system, there is a special type of spirit known as Chindi. Usually a byproduct of violence, whether accidental or while fighting a war, a chindi consists of everything bad that was in a departed person. Chindi can also be called out by not following the proper rites of human burial. In addition, the Chindi appears at the mention of the name of the deceased person, so the Navajo never talk about their dead relatives or friends. Sometimes chindi can terrorize an entire family for many decades, as is the case with the Long Salt family, which, according to legend, has been tormented for over 100 years.

The house or property of the deceased person are the most likely places for a chindi to appear, so they are often isolated or immediately destroyed. Because of this, the Navajo try to die outside the house so that the chindi does not appear in the house. Healers can send a curse on people who have done wrong with them and the damned will be tormented by jindi. In addition, Navajo believe that a disease known as “ghost disease” arises from contact with one of these spirits.

2. Funayurei
Folklore: Japanese

28

The spirits of those who perished in the sea, funury are common in Japanese folklore, and their name literally translates as "ship ghost". They are believed to possess supernatural powers, and can make any number of ghost ships appear. Then funayurey use them to force the living captains of nearby boats to turn off the course and, usually, to meet their death as a result of this.

According to some versions, the Funay are trying to get on board the ship of the living, where they feed on the emotions of unsuspecting sailors. Once on board, the ghost will ask for a special tool called hisyaku, which looks like a bucket. If the request is granted, the funayer will turn it over and the water will begin to flow from it in a magical way, ceasing only when the boat starts to go to the bottom. On small fishing boats, the funayer uses a tool to scoop ocean water inside until the boat sinks.

1. La Sayona
Folklore: Venezuelan

29

Another ghost, which according to legend comes from one person, La Siona, lives in Venezuela and other nearby countries.Originally a mortal woman named Melissa, she was very beautiful and found a loving husband with whom she had a son. When she bathed in the river, which was common, a strange man approached Melissa and told her that her husband was sleeping with her mother. In anger, she ran to her house, where her husband and son slept quietly in bed.

Blinded by rage, she burned down the whole house, killing them both. Then Melissa went to her mother's house, where she stabbed her to death. Right before her death, her mother cursed her, telling Melissa that she would be forced to walk the Earth, killing husbands who cheated on their wives. Today, she can be a beautiful woman strolling back and forth on the highway, luring men into their networks. She sometimes takes the form of a loved one to deceive men, and then shows a rotting skull, in the place where her face used to be.

Related news

  • How much sugar do drinks, fruit and sweets contain?
  • Some interesting facts about sports and sportsmen in questions and answers
  • How can you save at a wedding not to the detriment of the celebration
  • Happy New Year
  • 10 largest thefts of the 21st century
  • Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology

    Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology Top 10 Vengeful Ghosts in Folklore and Mythology