Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

October 28, 2015

er235pWWGIYResearchers believe that, thanks to digital technology, they have come close to deciphering the mysterious Indian civilization that has not yet been unraveled.

The Indus, or Harappa, civilization is one of the three most ancient civilizations of humanity along with the ancient Egyptian and Sumerian. Of all three, it occupied the largest area. The empire stretched over a million square miles across the Indus plains from the Arabian Sea to the Ganges in the territories that now belong to India, Pakistan and Afghanistan. The population in its heyday was about 5 million people.

Researchers have found the world's first famous toilet bowls, complex stone scales, necklaces made from treated gemstones, and other artifacts that testify to the high cultural development of that era. At the same time, as scientists believe, the Indian civilization did not have an army.

Proto-Indian writing is still not decrypted. The task is complicated by the lack of information about the language, as well as the brevity of the inscriptions found. Scientists only suggest that representatives of this civilization wrote from right to left, and the hieroglyphic signs were probably borrowed from pictography or invented by its models.

Up to 600 different Indian characters are now known, including the one that scientists call the "unicorn." In total, about a hundred academic publications were attempted, the authors of which tried to decipher texts, and it seems that the scientific community is close to achieving success. This helps them digital technology.

Scholar Rajesh Rao from the University of Washington at Seattle uses digital analysis to find patterns in symbols. The team of researchers under his leadership calculates the number of accidents in the letters using the programming language "Fortran". Scientists have already found that Indian writing is most similar to the Sumerian cuneiform.

Unfortunately, linguists do not yet have texts longer than 26 characters. Most likely, most of the written monuments of that era still lie in the ground.The fact is that out of more than 1000 identified fortifications of Indian times, only 10% were investigated. Many archaeological sites are located on the border of India and Pakistan, where excavations are impossible due to political tensions between the two countries. Scientists hope that research in these places will be conducted, which will allow to unravel the mystery of the writing of the disappeared civilization, reports The Daily Mail.

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  • Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization

    Scientists are trying to decipher the writing of an ancient civilization