Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

The earliest temples of ancient Egypt appeared in the middle of the 4th millennium BC and resembled reed huts. The last of the Egyptian temples built was the Temple at Philah, which was ceased to be used in the 6th century AD. Not surprisingly, this selection covers a wide variety of different structures built over a huge period of time. Your trip to Egypt will not be complete without visiting one of these places.

Great Temple of Medinet Habu11

Located on the West Bank of Luxor, Medinet Habu is the Arabic name of a huge temple complex. In terms of its size, it is inferior only to Karnak, but it is much better preserved to this day. Pharaohs Hatshepsut and Thutmos III built on this place a small temple in honor of Amun. Next to their temple, Ramses III built his tomb - the largest preserved monument of the Medinet Habu complex. Ramses III surrounded the complex of temples with a large brick wall that engulfed warehouses, workshops and residential buildings.

Temple Kom Ombo12

Among the greatest temples of ancient Egypt, it is impossible not to mention Kom Ombo. Located on a high overlooking the Nile dune, Kom Ombo is an unusual double temple. It was built during the reign of the Ptolemy dynasty. The original church began to be built under Ptolemy VI Filometor at the beginning of the second century BC. Kom Ombo actually includes two different temples that mirror each other. They have two entrances, two ships, two colonnades, two hypostyle halls and two shrines.

Colossi of Memnon13

Built around 1350 BC. The colossi of Memnon are two large stone statues. They depict sitting on the pedestal of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. The original purpose of the Colossi was to stand guard at the entrance to the temple of Amenhotep, where he was worshiped both before and after leaving the other world. Once it was one of the largest temples of ancient Egypt, but today it has almost completely disappeared, except for these two statues. Both Colossi are significantly damaged, and the details above the waist are almost unrecognizable.

Temples of Fillet Island14

Fillet Island was the center of the worship of the goddess Isis.The first temple on the island was built by the pharaohs from the 30th dynasty. The construction of the temple continued during the three centuries of the rule of the Greek Ptolemaic dynasty and the Roman rulers. In 100 AD, the Roman Emperor Trajan built the famous Traian booth, which most likely served as the river entrance to the great temple of Isis. In the 1960s, the temple and other monuments of Fillet were moved to the island of Agilika. UNESCO volunteers were engaged in relocation in order to save the historical legacy from the rising waters of the Nile in connection with the construction of the Aswan Dam. Fillet Island is currently flooded by Lake Nasser.

Edfu temple15

Edfu Temple is dedicated to the god with the head of an eagle, Choir, being the second largest Egyptian temple after Karnak and one of the most preserved. The construction of this temple began in 237 BC during the reign of Ptolemy III and ended almost two centuries later in 57 BC by Ptolemy XII, the father of the legendary queen Cleopatra. This temple consists of the traditional elements of the Egyptian Temples of the New Kingdom, along with several Greek buildings, among which it is worth mentioning the House of Birth (Mammisi).

Temple of Network I in Abydos16

The Temple of Seti I is the tomb of Pharaoh Seti I on the west bank of the Nile in Abydos. The ancient temple was built by the end of the reign of Seti, and completed by his son Ramses the Great after the death of his father in 1279 BC. The Abydos List is located in this temple - a chronological list of all the dynastic pharaohs of Ancient Egypt from the Egyptian king Menes (the founder of the first dynasty) to the father of Seti, Ramses I.

Egyptian Temple of Hatshepsut17

This temple is the tomb of Hatshepsut, which ruled Egypt from about 1479 BC until its death in 1458 BC. It is located on the west bank of the Nile. The colonnade building was designed and built by Egyptian architect Senmut. Royal architect Hatshepsut built a temple for her burial, as well as to honor the glory of Amun. Hatshepsut Temple is harmoniously inscribed on a cliff of a dramatically rising cliff with three stepped terraces reaching 30 meters in height. These terraces are connected by long ramps that were once surrounded by gardens.

Luxor Temple18

Luxor Temple is located on the east bank of the Nile River in the ancient city of Thebes. It was founded in 1400 BC during the New Kingdom.The temple was dedicated to the three Egyptian gods Amun, Mut and Khons. The temple was the center of the festival Opet - the most important festival in Thebes. During the annual festival, the statues of the three Gods were transferred from the temple of Amun at Karnak to the temple of Luxor along the sphinx road connecting 2 of these temples. Today, Luxor is the main destination for traveling in Upper Egypt, as well as an important stop during most Nile river cruises. Among the prominent temples of ancient Egypt, Luxor has always occupied a special place.

Abu Simbel19

The twin temples of Abu Simbel were carved in the side of a mountain during the reign of Pharaoh Ramses the Great in the 13th century BC. He created Abu Simbel, as an eternal monument to himself and his queen Nefertari. The complex was completely relocated in the 1960s to avoid the flooding of the man-made Lake Nasser. This giant artificial reservoir was formed after the dam was created on the Nile River. Abu Simbel remains one of the main tourist attractions of Egypt.

Karnak Temple of Ancient Egypt20

Even being terribly destroyed, the Temple of Karnak surpasses in its beauty most of the other sights of Egypt.This is the largest ancient religious building in the world, representing the combined result of the work of many generations of Egyptian builders. The Karnak Temple actually consists of three main Egyptian temples, smaller smaller temples, and several outer temples about 2.5 kilometers north of Luxor. It took thousands of years to build and expand the Temple of Karnak. Most of the work on Karnak was done by the pharaohs of the New Kingdom (1570-1100 BC). One of the most famous structures of Karnak is the Hypostyle Hall, 5,000 square meters in size with 134 large columns installed in 16 rows.



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  • Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt

    Greatest Temples of Ancient Egypt