15 known expressions and their true meaning

15 known expressions and their true meaning

63_123Learn about the history of the origin of these idioms - a real pleasure for all lovers of our rich language!

1. Why in the west were frightened of Khrushchev's “gangster mother”?

Khrushchev's famous phrase “I will show you gruel!” Was translated at the UN Assembly literally - “Kuzma’s mother”. The meaning of the phrase was completely incomprehensible, and from this the threat became completely ominous. Subsequently, the expression "Kuz'kina mother" was also used to designate atomic bombs of the USSR.

2. Where did the expression “after the rain on Thursday” come from?

The expression “after a rain on Thursday” arose because of the distrust of Perun, the Slavic god of thunder and lightning, whose day was Thursday. Pleas for him often did not reach the goal, so they began to talk about the unrealizable that it would happen after a rain on Thursday.

3. Who said for the first time: “Whoever comes to us with a sword, will perish by the sword”?

The expression “Whoever comes with a sword to us will die by the sword” does not belong to Alexander Nevsky.Its author is the screenwriter of the film of the same name, Pavlenko, who reworked the phrase from the Gospel "Those who take the sword will perish with the sword."

4. Where did the expression “the game is not worth the candle” come from?

The expression “the game is not worth the candle” came from the speech of the gamblers, who spoke so much about a very small win, which does not pay back the cost of the candles that burned during the game.

5. Where did the expression “Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears” come from?

During the rise of the Moscow principality, great tribute was levied from other cities. Cities sent petitioners to Moscow with complaints of injustice. The king sometimes severely punished the complainants to intimidate others. From here, according to one of the versions, the expression “Moscow does not believe in tears” occurred.

6. Where did the expression “business smell of kerosene” come from?

In 1924 Koltsov’s feuilleton was told about a large swindle revealed during the transfer of the concession for the exploitation of oil in California. In the scam were involved the most senior US officials. The expression “the case smells like kerosene” was first used here.

7. Where did the expression “there is nothing for the soul” come from?

In ancient times it was believed that the soul of a person is placed in a recess between the collarbone, a dimple in the neck.In the same place on the chest was the custom to keep money. Therefore, they say about a poor man that “he has nothing for his soul.”

8. Where did the expression "to beat baklushi" come from?

In the old days, chocks chopped from logs - blanks for wooden utensils - were called baklushas. Their production was considered easy, effortless and skillful business. Now we use the expression "to beat the backslash" to denote idleness.

9. Where did the expression “by hook or by crook” come from?

In the old days, the village women, after washing, “rolled” the linen with the help of a special rolling pin. Well-rolled linen turned out to be squeezed, ironed and clean, even if the wash was not very high quality. Today, to denote the achievement of a goal in any way, the phrase “by hook or by crook” is used.

10. Where did the expression “case in a hat” come from?

In the old days, the messengers who delivered the mail sewed very important papers or “deeds” under the lining of their caps or hats so as not to attract the attention of robbers. From here comes the expression "the case in the hat."

11. Where did the expression "come back to our sheep" come from?

In the medieval French comedy, a rich clothier sues the shepherd, who pulled off his sheep.During the meeting, the clothier forgets about the shepherd and showered reproaches on his lawyer, who did not pay him for six cubits of cloth. The judge interrupts his speech with the words: “Let’s return to our sheep”, which have become winged.

12. Where did the phrase “make a contribution” come from?

In ancient Greece, there was a small coin mite. In a Gospel parable, a poor widow donates the last two mites to build a temple. From the parable came the expression "to make a contribution."

13. Where did the expression "Kolomna Verst" come from?

In the 17th century, by order of Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich, distance measurement was made between Moscow and the summer royal residence in the village of Kolomenskoye and very high milestones were installed. Since then, tall and thin people have been called “mile Kolomna”.

14. Where did the expression “chase the long ruble” come from?

In the 13th century, the hryvnia divided into 4 parts (“ruble”) was the monetary and weight unit in Russia. Especially weighty residue of the ingot was called the "long ruble." With these words is connected the expression about a large and easy earnings - “chasing after a long ruble”.

15. Where did the expression "newspaper duck" come from?

“One scientist, having bought 20 ducks, immediately ordered to chop one of them into small pieces, with which he fed the rest of the birds. A few minutes later, he did the same thing with another duck, and so on, until he was alone, who devoured, in this way, 19 of her friends. ” This note was published in the newspaper by the Belgian humorist Cornelissen, to make fun of the credulity of the public. Since then, according to one of the versions, the false news is called "newspaper ducks".

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  • 15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning

    15 known expressions and their true meaning